Breaking News

Chemical Technique Restores Fingerprints

November 14, 2005

l Scientists at the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN, have devised a simple chemical technique that renders faint fingerprints more readable. Freshly-washed hands and the hands of young children lack sufficient sebum to leave clear fingerprints, according to the researchers. By exposing such “ghost” fingerprints to acetic acid, a common chemical found in vinegar, the prints can be rejuvenated, making it possible to apply chemical-fuming and dusting techniques usually employed to highlight and preserve good prints.
Bill Doyne, a forensic expert with the U.S. Army criminal investigation laboratory, said the technique “may be a very viable method of regenerating older prints,” while crime scene investigators may be able to utilize the chemical to reveal criminals.

  • Skin of Color Society Connects Experts

    Skin of Color Society Connects Experts

    Melissa Meisel, Associate Editor||January 16, 2017
    Dermatologists from across the nation share information and ideas.

  • Erasa

    Erasa's New Evangelist(a)

    January 9, 2017
    Impressed by the performance of its hero SKU, supermodel Linda Evangelista joins the company in a hand's on role.

  • Discourse on Disclosure

    Discourse on Disclosure

    Tom Branna, Editorial Director||January 6, 2017
    Transparency impacts the cleaning industry.

  • Hitting the Right Notes

    Hitting the Right Notes

    January 6, 2017
    Agilex Fragrances is the leader in the middle market fragrance category.

  • The Smell of Clean in 2017

    The Smell of Clean in 2017

    January 6, 2017
    Changing consumer lifestyles and demographics are impacting the scents found in the household cleaning category.

  • On the Edge

    On the Edge

    January 6, 2017
    Expanding beauty brands to watch in 2017