Breaking News

Nutrition Better Indicates Cavities, Not Fluoridated Water

November 15, 2005

Cavities occur in 60% of U.S. preschool children, and more often in the poorly nourished, according to the New York State Coalition Opposed to Fluoridation in an article published in the Journal of the American Dental Association in January. Researchers said skipped breakfast is associated with higher caloric intake, poor nutrient intake and obesity, which are linked to cavities. For instance, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the United Health Foundation reported 87% of West Virginians drink fluoridated water yet have the fewest teeth in the U.S. and are at high risk for heart disease and diabetes. In contrast, Utah, where about 3% of water supplies are fluoridated, residents lose the fewest teeth and are at low risk for heart disease and diabetes.
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