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DS Containers Partners With Daiwa Can Company

November 22, 2005

DS Containers plans to open a new 236,000-square-foot plant in Batavia, IL, in the second quarter of 2005. Two high speed production lines will utilize proprietary technology from Japan-based Daiwa Can Company to produce two-piece tin-free steel cans featuring interior and exterior lamination. The partnership with DS Containers marks Daiwa’s first venture into manufacturing in the U.S.
DS Containers will initially target the aerosol sector, but company executives said the new can is adaptable to any liquid or viscous product. The interior lamination is FDA-approved and the company is working with closure manufacturers to accommodate multiple uses for food, pharmaceutical, health and beauty applications.
In market tests conducted by DS Containers, the new can scored substantially higher in consumer appeal when compared to the traditional three-piece aerosol can, company executives said.
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