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Menís Grooming Products Expected to Grow Just 2% By 2009



Published November 22, 2005
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Though men’s-only grooming product sales have seen 6% growth during the past few years, Kline & Co. predicts growth will level off at 2% in the next four to five years, according to “The U.S. male grooming products market in 2003” report. Datamonitor, New York, said the $12 billion U.S. men’s personal care market is expected to climb 15% to $14 billion by 2008, as reported in “Changing male grooming occasions and behaviors.”
“Although the ‘Queer Eye’ guys’ 15 minutes of fame aren’t quite up yet, the recent media blitz over male grooming and style consciousness has likely peaked,” insisted Kline’s Consumer Products Practice industry manager Carrie Bonner. “More men aren’t necessarily using more products; a lot of them switched from the brands they were using. So some of the growth has come at the expense of unisex brands.”
However, Datamonitor reported that within the men’s market, skin care sales are forecast to grow a healthy 33% to $673 million by 2008. Personal hygiene is the largest category, at $8.3 billion in 2003, followed by hair care ($2.4 billion) and fragrances ($912 million).
Forty-four percent of men rely on their partner for new personal care product information, and 39% dislike spending time in the personal care department and more than 25% have left a store without making an intended purchase due to an uncomfortable retail environment, Data-monitor revealed. Al-so, Datamonitor said both marketers and retailers have to break the so-called “macho” barrier.
“This reticence can be overcome by placing male grooming products not amongst the generally much larger area dedicating to women’s cosmetics and toiletries but near to traditionally more ‘male’ products in a supermarket or department store,” insisted author of the report and Datamonitor consumer analyst Lawrence Gould.
“Companies will have to figure out how to differentiate their brands and how to position them for the long term,” added Kline’s Ms. Bonner.
The “metrosexual” trend has seen a backlash from male consumers, who are often reluctant to try new products. Datamonitor said 33% of men said paying too much attention to their appearance was an effeminate trait that deterred them from purchasing grooming products.
More info: (973) 435-3412; Website: www.klinegroup.com/y576.htm.


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