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P&G Enters Clean-Water Deal For Dominican Republic

April 11, 2006

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC: Procter & Gamble Co. has teamed with a nonprofit group to distribute water purification systems in the Dominican Republic in a continued effort to help eliminate disease in poorer countries. The arrangement, with Population Services International (PSI), will combine P&G’s commercial distribution system with PSI’s network of community groups to bring PUR water purification sachets to consumers for about 13 cents each. They are about the size of a ketchup packet and when mixed with 10 liters of water, force contaminants and dirt to the bottom, so water can then be filtered through a cloth.
Procter has been working with nonprofit groups to provide clean water since 2003, when the United Agency for International Development provided funding for the Safe Drinking Water Alliance. The partnership launched P&G’s PUR to provide safe water in several countries, including Ethiopia, Haiti and Pakistan.
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