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Demand for Cosmeceutical Chemicals

August 17, 2006

Demand for cosmetic and toiletry chemicals in the U.S. is forecast to on rise 5.4% per year ultimately reaching $7.6 billion in 2010, according to Cosmetic & Toiletry Chemicals, a new study from The Freedonia Group, Inc., a Cleveland-based industry market research firm. Favorable trends in demographics, such as an aging and increasingly ethnically diverse population, consumer desires to offset the effects of aging and preferences for natural products are among the factors that will drive the demand. As a result, active plant-derived ingredients will benefit the most.
Continued gains in cosmeceutical skin care products will cause a growth in demand for active ingredients, such as enzymes, amino acids and peptides. Natural products, botanical extracts, for example, are expected to achieve substantial growth rates, as they are increasingly incorporated into formulated products. Traditional cosmetic and toiletry chemicals, such as commodity surfactants, are likely to experience limited gains for reasons like a trend away from harsh chemicals, and the popularity of water-based formulations in skin care and hair care products.
A few segments are poised for rapid growth through 2010, including male grooming, ethnic products, anti-aging and 50-plus. Specialized facial cleansers and skin care items are providing a golden opportunity for the male grooming category. More info: www.freedoniagroup.com.
Demand for Cosmeceutical Chemicals
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