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Antioxidant Claims Boom In Personal Care



Published August 31, 2012
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Antioxidant Claims Boom In Personal Care

Packaged Facts estimates that antioxidant-featuring foods, beverages, supplements, and personal care/cosmetics totaled $65 billion in US retail sales in 2011, up 9% over 2010. By 2016, the market is projected to approach $86 billion—and personal care and cosmetics are a particularly hot area.
Packaged Facts estimates that personal care/cosmetic products tagged with the word “antioxidant” registered retail sales of $3.9 billion in 2011, with skin care the leading category at $2.2 billion. This overall personal care/cosmetics figure presents a 12.7% gain over $3.5 billion in 2010.

American consumers not only approach foods and beverages from a nutritional supplementation perspective, but also have come to regard health and beauty care products as extensions of the foods they eat and the nutritional supplements they take.

According to David Sprinkle, publisher of Packaged Facts, “what has emerged is a continuum of nutrient-positioned products extending from whole foods to fortified/functional foods and nutritional supplements and to personal care products, cosmetics.”

There is tremendous growth potential for antioxidant product marketers during the next 10 years, according to Packaged Facts. Several drivers are fueling this market, including consumers living longer than ever before, the uncertain state of the healthcare system and of environmental protection, and increased demands for vitality in a highly competitive job market.

Moreover, marketers and media of all stripes continue to educate consumers about the anti-aging and immunity-boosting qualities of antioxidants—making antioxidants a household word and helping to counteract barriers raised by the complexity of the antioxidant health message, the lack of content standards, and somewhat stringent FDA guidance on nutrient content claims for antioxidant foods and beverages.

According to a Packaged Facts survey conducted over February-March 2012, 44% of women buy skin care or cosmetic products that promote their antioxidant content.

More info: www.MarketResearch.com or www.packagedfacts.com

US Cosmetic & Toiletry Chemicals Market Forecast

• The US demand for cosmetic and toiletry chemicals is forecasted to rise 5% a year to $9.9 billion in 2016, according to a report available from Reportlinker.com.

Greater consumer spending on cosmetic and toiletry products, as well as trends favoring organic and natural formulations, will continue to aid growth in chemical demand. Advances in volume demand will remain healthy, though limited by the increasing use of higher value ingredients that are more effective at lower loadings.

Consumer preference for active and natural ingredients will drive demand for products such as enzymes, amino acids, and botanical extracts. Increasing use of cosmeceutical skin care products will aid consumption of such high value additives as nanoscale ingredients. Botanical extracts will benefit from their perception as being more natural and thus more healthful than traditional cosmetic and toiletry chemicals, such as petroleum oils and commodity surfactants. These latter products will experience limited gains, primarily due to the popularity of water-based formulations in skin and hair care products, and a trend away from chemicals perceived as being harsh.

Specialty additives, and emollients and moisturizing agents will register the most rapid growth in demand through 2016, as consumers expect higher performance from their cosmetic and toiletry products. Active ingredients in particular will post above average gains among specialty additives.
Several segments in the cosmetic and toiletry industry, including organic and natural products, male grooming, ethnic products, and anti-aging, are poised for rapid growth, directly impacting the mix of the chemicals used in their formulation.

This study presents historical demand data plus forecasts for 2016 and 2021 by product, function and market. The study also considers key market environment factors, examines industry structure, evaluates company market share and profiles 34 competitors.

More info: nicolasbombourg@reportlinker.com

Are Parents Failing in Back-To- School Bargain Shopping?

• Only 26% of parents say they are shopping wherever the best back-to-school (BTS) promotions are offered, according to WSL/Strategic Retail’sBack-to-School 2012 How America Shopstrend report, which tracked what stores and categories parents are shopping.

“Given today’s promotion-driven retail climate, it was surprising to learn that it’s not only about finding the best deal this season,” said Wendy Liebmann, CEO of WSL/Strategic Retail.“Yes, it’s about the right price—but that’s only part of the story.It’s also about seeking out a broad selection of merchandise in a convenient place, and most parents already have a clear idea of where they can find that for back-to-school.For 75% of them, that means heading to a mass merchant such as Target or Walmart.”

Where are parents shopping? Three-quarters of respondents said mass merchandisers such as Target, Walmart and Kmart.

“Health and wellness are evolving into an important focus for parents shopping back-to-school, which presents an emerging opportunity for drug stores to capitalize on the season,” continued Candace Corlett, president of WSL/Strategic Retail.“As this trend continues, look for drug store chains to see this as their opportunity to gain a greater share of b-t-s dollars, possibly pushing other channels further down the list.”

What’s In Their Basket:
84%—School supplies
76%—Clothing and fashion accessories
50%—Healthy snacks
38%—Anti-bacterial items
30%—Hair care products

The How America Shops Internet survey was conducted as a nationwide survey of men and women 18+ in June, 2012.

More info:www.wslstrategicretail.com

Online Coupon Hunting Habits

• Nearly half of US consumers—about 88.2 million—will use online coupons and codes during 2012, according to a recent analysis done by eMarketer, and by the end of 2013, 96.8 million US adults will have used such discounts.

88.2 million US consumers will use online coupons and codes this year, according to eMarketer.

In its Buy-havior Report, coupon search engine ShopAtHome.com found that when consumers searched for online coupons and savings, 62% looked for store-centric deals, 24% for product-specific coupons, while only 14% search specifically for brand name product discounts online.

“Consumers are really creatures of habit when it comes to looking for coupons—they go where they know they can consistently find the best deals,” said Marc Braunstein, co-founder and CEO of ShopAtHome.com. “At ShopAtHome.com, we make it easy for people to find these deals, regardless of what they are looking for, by showing them the best coupons from the widest variety of retailers and brands.”

Following toilet paper, “laundry detergent” was the next highest search, with 16,307 consumers looking for online savings.

Swiffer was the second most searched-for brand on the list. However it was far behind the most searched brand (Sony).

The study also found that 73% of consumers using ShopAtHome.com used it between 7am and 6pm, regardless of the day of the week. Only 18% used it after 6pm.

More info: www.ShopAtHome.com


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