Welcome Guest to Happi

Subscribe Free: Magazine | eNewsletter

current issue August 2014
 •  Purell on Campus  •  The Next Multifunctional Ingredient  •  Urban Decay Adds On To ‘Naked’ Empire  •  Prestige Beauty Sales Rise in Q2  •  Carmex Takes On Cold Sores
Print

Antioxidant Claims Boom In Personal Care



Published August 31, 2012
Related Searches: continue retail spa body
Post a comment


• Packaged Facts estimates that antioxidant-featuring foods, beverages, supplements, and personal care/cosmetics totaled $65 billion in US retail sales in 2011, up 9% over 2010. By 2016, the market is projected to approach $86 billion—and personal care and cosmetics are a particularly hot area.
Packaged Facts estimates that personal care/cosmetic products tagged with the word “antioxidant” registered retail sales of $3.9 billion in 2011, with skin care the leading category at $2.2 billion. This overall personal care/cosmetics figure presents a 12.7% gain over $3.5 billion in 2010.

American consumers not only approach foods and beverages from a nutritional supplementation perspective, but also have come to regard health and beauty care products as extensions of the foods they eat and the nutritional supplements they take.


According to David Sprinkle, publisher of Packaged Facts, “what has emerged is a continuum of nutrient-positioned products extending from whole foods to fortified/functional foods and nutritional supplements and to personal care products, cosmetics.”

There is tremendous growth potential for antioxidant product marketers during the next 10 years, according to Packaged Facts. Several drivers are fueling this market, including consumers living longer than ever before, the uncertain state of the healthcare system and of environmental protection, and increased demands for vitality in a highly competitive job market.

Moreover, marketers and media of all stripes continue to educate consumers about the anti-aging and immunity-boosting qualities of antioxidants—making antioxidants a household word and helping to counteract barriers raised by the complexity of the antioxidant health message, the lack of content standards, and somewhat stringent FDA guidance on nutrient content claims for antioxidant foods and beverages.

According to a Packaged Facts survey conducted over February-March 2012, 44% of women buy skin care or cosmetic products that promote their antioxidant content.

More info: www.MarketResearch.com or www.packagedfacts.com


blog comments powered by Disqus