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The Best US Cities for Your Skin

August 30, 2013

Where you live impacts skin health

Sunscreen? Got it. Anti-aging lotion? Check. Mailing address? Huh? Good genes and proper maintenance are keys to healthy skin, but where you live also plays an important role in skin health, according to Daily Glow. The site recently named the 10 best and 10 worst US cities for skin care—and some on the list—like New York City—will surprise you.

The 10 Best and Why:
1. Portland, OR. Lowest pollution and ozone rates.
2. San Francisco, CA. Lowest number of tanning beds per capita.
3. Seattle, WA. The sun shines only 47% of the time.
4. Baltimore, MD. Lowest incidence of melanoma.
5. Chicago, IL. Highest number of skin care specialists.
6. Honolulu, HI. Lowest rate of air particle pollution.
7. Boston, MA. Most dermatologists per 100,000 people.
8. New York, NY. Lowest skin cancer death rate.
9. Milwaukee, WI. Long winters and short summers.
10. Austin, TX. Most physically active population.

The 10 Worst and Why:
1. Las Vegas, NV. Large percentage of poplulation smokes (22.3%).
2. Phoenix, AZ. High summer temps (92.8°F on average) and sunshine rates (85%)/
3. Fresno, CA. High levels of pollution.
4. Sacramento, CA. One-third of adults have had at least one sunburn this year.
5. Los Angeles, CA. Low level of dermatologists per capita.
6. San Diego, CA. Most melanoma cases per capita.
7. Charlotte, NC. High ozone and pollution levels.
8. Memphis, TN. Least physically active population.
9. Fort Worth, TX. High number of tanning beds per capita.
10. Tulsa, OK. High cancer death rate.

Related End-User Markets:

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