Breaking News

Lush Switches Cocoa Butter Formulation

June 19, 2014

Will replace with Fair Trade organic.

Starting later this summer, Lush Cosmetics will be phasing out the entire conventional cocoa butter supply chain, replacing it with Fair Trade Organic cocoa butter from the Dominican Republic. According to the company, the switch is one Lush has been looking to make for several reasons: the organic movement that has become so popular and is one the natural marketer agrees with to offer as many products free of pesticides and chemicals.
 
Another reason is that the cost of cocoa butter has gone up significantly, so the different in cost between conventional and organic is getting closer, making it more accessible to companies that make frequent purchases. For Lush, developing cocoa sites around the world to purchase beans from directly will ensure traceability and in turn will positivity affect the local communities, it contends.
 
According to the company: “Conventional cocoa butter, for the most part is sourced from West Africa, most of this is not grown in a way that’s’ completely traceable as its sold at terminal markets and for the last 10 years there has been stories of indentured and child labor on cocoa farms in West Africa (for example, Ghana).  Other industries have admitted to the fact that cocoa in Africa (i.e. the chocolate industry) has been harvested by slaves. Due to the fact that Lush was able to find a supplier that could meet the cocoa butter need and deliver Fair Trade Organic cocoa butter rather than conventional, the switch, while it took time, was a no brainer.
 
“For this reason most of all, Lush will be sourcing cocoa butter from cooperative farms in the Dominican Republic, which have strict regulations against child labor. This is only an intermediary step in the cocoa butter supply chain strategy. The long term vision is to contract beans directly from sustainable projects funded by Lush. By purchasing beans directly from these projects, it will allow Lush to contribute to the economic development and environmental renewal of regions for which organic and fair trade certifications are not practical or relevant.”
blog comments powered by Disqus
  • What’s New at La Prairie?

    What’s New at La Prairie?

    Melissa Meisel, Associate Editor||April 25, 2016
    VP of marketing shares the latest buzz with Happi.

  • Mapping Out Multicultural Beauty

    Mapping Out Multicultural Beauty

    April 25, 2016
    Agnieszka Saintemarie of Kline Group about current trends and challenges in multicultural beauty.

  • At a Loss for Curls?

    April 22, 2016
    Amplixin, a Miami-based maker of hair strengthening products, has a solution for hair loss.

  • Who Makes That?

    Who Makes That?

    Tom Branna, Editorial Director||April 1, 2016
    From concept and formulation to testing and filling, today’s contract manufacturers perform a range of services for marketers

  • Multi-Cultural Beauty Update

    Multi-Cultural Beauty Update

    Christine Esposito, Associate Editor||April 1, 2016
    Established brands and start-ups address the needs of multi-cultural beauty consumers.

  • The Scalp Microbiome

    The Scalp Microbiome

    Nava Dayan PhD, Dr. Nava Dayan LLC||April 1, 2016
    A review of recent findings and innovative approaches for treating scalp disorders.