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Start Them Young



Using her four daughters as inspiration--and market research--Brandi Wallace's Blossom is addressing the personal care needs of 5-12 year old girls.



Published November 5, 2008
Related Searches: skin damage acne lotion
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Start Them Young



Using her four daughters as inspiration—and market research—Brandi Wallace’s Blossom is addressing the personal care needs of 5-12 year old girls.



By Christine Esposito
Associate Editor



Most little girls like playing dress up and dipping into mom’s makeup bag for some lipstick, blusher or eyeshadow. By mimicking what mom does, they are learning the tricks of trade, the skills they will perfect over time as they grow into tweens, teens and women who will someday purchase a bevy of beauty products.


But how often do little girls practice washing their face or applying a moisturizer with SPF? As we have come to learn, these are the skills—and products—necessary to protect the skin against damage and maintain a youthful appearance.


Nearly three years ago, Brandi Wallace had a full plate. She was a stay-at-home mom with five children, including four girls. When her eldest daughter hit 10, Ms. Wallace knew she needed to start teaching her how to take care of her skin.


“I went to the store to find whatever products were out there for their age group,” she told HAPPI. “I was quite surprised to discover that there were no brands with skin care for children or tweens. All I could find were acne products.”


Using her four daughters as inspiration—and market research—the Blossom line was born out of that experience. The range is segmented into specific categories, named for each of her daughters. Bailey Skin Care 101 includes foaming cleanser, toner, moisturizer with SPF 15, and oil-free night lotion; Berry bath and body products includes body lotion, mist and powder and shower gel; the Brooklyn hair care range includes shampoo, conditioner, mask treatment and a conditioner mist with sunscreen; and Bexley skin care, which features facial scrub, moisturizer with SPF 30, facial mask and lip balm. The range—which is currently available in select children spas and boutiques department stores in Illinois, Missouri, Ohio and California, and online at www.blossom4girls.com—has price points between $10.50 -$16.50.


Formulated with natural and gentle ingredients, Blossom is designed to work with the delicate needs of “blooming” skin—not for teens or babies. Specifically, Blossom is geared for girls ages 5-12, which according to Ms. Wallace, is an overlooked group.  


But that may not be for long. For starters, at HBA Global Expo this past September, Blossom caught the attention of major players. “Our booth at HBA Global Expo was a big hit, and I had most of the “big guns” looking at our collections.”


“I do see other companies getting into the category eventually,” she added, noting the presence of new brands touting basic all-over washes for face or body as well as other hair care and bath products geared for young children. But according to Ms. Wallace, none offer specialized solutions or have the benefit of Blossom’s unique market research and development team.


“What makes our Brooklyn Hair Care line and our Berry Bath and Body collection stand out is that they were truly created by girls. Instead of giving girls the typical Strawberry, Grape and Bubble Gum scents, we went straight to the girls and let them decided, and what they created is quite different than what is traditionally offered to them,” she said.    


And that unique approach is what Ms. Wallace believes will keep Blossom relevant in what is destined to become a more crowded marketplace.  “I think it’s so exciting to be pioneering a new category in the beauty industry. Blossom is paving the way in this category.”


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