Breaking News

US Cosmetics and Toiletries Sales Rise 3.1-3.6% in 2011

February 1, 2013

According to preliminary data from Kline, US cosmetics and toiletries sales will rise 3.1-3.6% this year—that’s ahead of last year’s 2.4% growth, according to the Parsippany, NJ-based research company.
The prestige channel is the big winner in 2011, as sales are expected to jump 7-8%.


For Saks Fifth Avenue, cosmetics were one of its strongest performing categories last year.


In its report, Kline noted that Saks called cosmetics one of its strongest performing categories. In contrast, sales in mass are expected to increase 2-3%, which is about the same rate of growth as during the recession, according to findings.


In other channels, direct sales were projected to rise 2-3% in 2011, specialty store sales are expected to rise 4-5% and professional sales will gain just 1-2%.


Kline will issue its report next month.


More info: www.klinegroup.com

  • It’s Magic!

    It’s Magic!

    Melissa Meisel, Associate Editor||March 20, 2017
    Argan oil-infused ‘Moroccan’ lip care brand jumps from WholeFoods into CVS.

  • On the Cutler Edge

    On the Cutler Edge

    Melissa Meisel, Associate Editor||March 13, 2017
    Top brand source at Redken forecasts up-to-the-minute hair trends.

  • Take The Hint

    Take The Hint

    Christine Esposito, Associate Editor||March 13, 2017
    Water brand forays into sun protection by capitalizing on scent and experience.

  • Supply-Side Innovations

    Supply-Side Innovations

    Tom Branna, Editorial Director||March 1, 2017
    Raw material suppliers roll up their sleeves and roll out their new products for the global cleaning industry.

  • New Faces in Familiar Places

    New Faces in Familiar Places

    Tom Branna, Editorial Director||March 1, 2017
    The American Cleaning Institute officially welcomed its new president.

  • Special Delivery

    Special Delivery

    Tom Branna, Editorial Director||March 1, 2017
    UV protection is important, but what good is that sunscreen if consumers won’t apply it?