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Gojo Industries “Kill a Gajillion Germs” Pledge

August 2, 2013

Gojo Industries is asking parents, teachers and schools to take the “Kill a Gajillion Germs” pledge towards everyday healthy hand hygiene this school year. 

The campaign started on July 15, with moms, dads and school leaders pledging to support healthy habits with the chance to win free Purell, dispensers and hand hygiene educational materials for their school along with individual prizes.  

“Moms, teachers and principals all want a healthy school year,” said Kathleen Hooker, marketing director, Purell Consumer Business.  “The Purell Kill A Gajillion Germs campaign is celebrating and raising awareness for the everyday habit of good hand hygiene.  In a study conducted in schools, absenteeism caused by illness was 51% lower in classrooms that used Purell Hand Sanitizer regularly and implemented a hand hygiene educational program versus classrooms that did not. “

Consumers can also download coupons for in-store purchases.
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