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Metrosexuals Are All the Rage…in China

A billion-dollar market with room to grow.

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By: Tom Branna

Metrosexuals Are All the Rage…in China

The metrosexual trend has come and gone in North America and Western Europe, but the guys still have it in places like Korea, Japan and, most especially, China. In fact, facial skin care is the fastest growing men's grooming category in that country. That popularity, in turn, has spurred demand for creams, lotions and serums among men, according to a new study by Frost & Sullivan.


In fact, Neil Wang, global partner and president at Frost and Sullivan China, insists that China is becoming the world's largest market for men's skin care products, with a market size of more than $1 billion. South Korea is a distant No. 2, with sales of about $700 million. By 2020, the size of the male facial skin care market in China is projected to reach nearly $1.8 billion, according to Mintel Group Ltd. Clearly, Chinese hold skin care in high regard.


“More than 80% of the Chinese men hold an opinion that skin care is important,” said Wang. “They are willing to spend about 25 minutes every day on skin care products on average.”


Driving the increasing consumption of male cosmetics is the widespread belief in China that looking good plays an important part in succeeding socially and professionally.
For example, Ding Chen is a 30-year-old businessman who spends nearly $100 every two months on personal care, particularly on moisturizers, cleansers and cologne.


“Men spend money on beauty products for improving self-confidence, attracting women and building a better self image. After all, good first impressions can make a big difference,” he said.


That is also an opportunity for foreign brands, which control three-quarters of the men's grooming market in China, to launch beauty products for appearance-conscious consumers. Shiseido, which developed the Aupres Mens beauty line exclusively for the Chinese market back in 1994, expects the men's skin care market in the country to maintain a growth momentum of over 10 per cent in 2016. The company is also using the boom in men's beauty products as an opportunity to boost spending in China.


Meanwhile, Beiersdorf AG expects a jump in online sales for its Nivea beauty brand in China due to a change in the younger generation's shopping behavior. Online sales in the men's grooming market in China currently account for 40% of total sales, according to Nielsen Holdings NV.

Facial skin care is the men's grooming category that is experiencing the most dynamic growth in China, with beauty products for men quickly rising in popularity. – See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/lifestyle/metrosexuals-spawn-14b-cosmetics-market-china#sthash.aXOOq97g.dpuf
Facial skin care is the men's grooming category that is experiencing the most dynamic growth in China, with beauty products for men quickly rising in popularity. – See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/lifestyle/metrosexuals-spawn-14b-cosmetics-market-china#sthash.aXOOq97g.dpufThe metrosexual trend has come and gone in North America and Western Europe, but it still has legs in South Korea, Japan and, most especially, China.According to study by Frost & Sullivan, facial skin care is the fastest growing men's grooming category in China. Demand has helped propel sales of men's beauty products throughout the country.

“China is becoming the world's largest market for men's skin care products”, said Neil Wang, global partner and president at consulting firm Frost and Sullivan China. “The market size is over $1 billion (S$1.4 billion), followed by South Korea with total sales value of about $0.7 billion”.
The size of the male facial skin care market in China is projected to reach 11.5 billion yuan by 2020 from 7.3 billion yuan in 2014, according to market research firm Mintel Group Ltd.
“More than 80 per cent of the Chinese men hold an opinion that skin care is important,” said Wang from Frost and Sullivan. “They are willing to spend about 25 minutes every day on skin care products on average”.
Driving the increasing consumption of male cosmetics is the widespread belief in China that looking good plays an important part in succeeding socially and professionally.
Ding Chen, a 30-year-old businessman who spends up to 600 yuan every two months on personal care, particularly on moisturizers, cleansers and cologne, said: “Men spend money on beauty products for improving self-confidence, attracting women and building a better self image. After all, good first impressions can make a big difference.”
That is also an opportunity for foreign brands, which currently take 76.6 per cent share of the men's grooming market in China, to launch beauty products for appearance-conscious consumers.
Satoshi Hirota, a press representative of Japanese cosmetics manufacturer Shiseido Company Ltd, said: “We anticipate huge growth potential in the male beauty market as more and more men are paying attention to their appearance. This year, sales of Shiseido Men's lotion and emulsion in China rose by more than 10 per cent from the levels in 2014”.
Sisheido, which developed the Aupres Mens beauty line exclusively for the Chinese market back in 1994, expects the men's skin care market in the country to maintain a growth momentum of over 10 per cent in 2016. The company is also using the boom in men's beauty products as an opportunity to boost spending in China.
“We cannot reveal the exact amount but we are planning to invest more for expanding points of contact with consumers,” said Hirota.
Germany's Beiersdorf AG sees huge potential in online sales for its Nivea beauty brand in China due to a change in the younger generation's shopping behaviour.
Online sales in the men's grooming market in China currently account for 40 per cent of total sales, according to US-based information provider Nielsen Holdings NV.
Inken Hollmann-Peters, vice-president of Corporate Communications at Beiersdorf, said: “Unlike five years ago when hypermarket and supermarket channels were still dominant, now more men choose to shop from online or cosmetic stores. We estimate a growth (in the men's grooming market in China) of around 15 per cent or more from 2015 to 2020 for both online and offline channels.”
United States-based Procter & Gamble Co, manufacturer of Gillette razors and the Olay Mens Solutions skin care brand, agrees that most men are moving from offline to online channels to purchase grooming products.
Erica Li, a press representative at P&G said: “They even use e-commerce search as the first step to gain product knowledge.”
Increasing disposable income and the desire for a better lifestyle are some of the factors that are expected to keep driving the industry in the coming years, with men being increasingly adventurous with high-end beauty products that go beyond the most basic needs.
Chen Wenwen, a senior beauty analyst at Mintel, said: “There is still huge potential in the men's grooming market in China as customers move on to pricier categories, particularly eye care, serum, or facial cream products with makeup benefits.”
– See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/lifestyle/metrosexuals-spawn-14b-cosmetics-market-china#sthash.aXOOq97g.dpuf
“China is becoming the world's largest market for men's skin care products”, said Neil Wang, global partner and president at consulting firm Frost and Sullivan China. “The market size is over $1 billion (S$1.4 billion), followed by South Korea with total sales value of about $0.7 billion”.
The size of the male facial skin care market in China is projected to reach 11.5 billion yuan by 2020 from 7.3 billion yuan in 2014, according to market research firm Mintel Group Ltd.
“More than 80 per cent of the Chinese men hold an opinion that skin care is important,” said Wang from Frost and Sullivan. “They are willing to spend about 25 minutes every day on skin care products on average”.
Driving the increasing consumption of male cosmetics is the widespread belief in China that looking good plays an important part in succeeding socially and professionally.
Ding Chen, a 30-year-old businessman who spends up to 600 yuan every two months on personal care, particularly on moisturizers, cleansers and cologne, said: “Men spend money on beauty products for improving self-confidence, attracting women and building a better self image. After all, good first impressions can make a big difference.”
That is also an opportunity for foreign brands, which currently take 76.6 per cent share of the men's grooming market in China, to launch beauty products for appearance-conscious consumers.
Satoshi Hirota, a press representative of Japanese cosmetics manufacturer Shiseido Company Ltd, said: “We anticipate huge growth potential in the male beauty market as more and more men are paying attention to their appearance. This year, sales of Shiseido Men's lotion and emulsion in China rose by more than 10 per cent from the levels in 2014”.
Sisheido, which developed the Aupres Mens beauty line exclusively for the Chinese market back in 1994, expects the men's skin care market in the country to maintain a growth momentum of over 10 per cent in 2016. The company is also using the boom in men's beauty products as an opportunity to boost spending in China.
“We cannot reveal the exact amount but we are planning to invest more for expanding points of contact with consumers,” said Hirota.
Germany's Beiersdorf AG sees huge potential in online sales for its Nivea beauty brand in China due to a change in the younger generation's shopping behaviour.
Online sales in the men's grooming market in China currently account for 40 per cent of total sales, according to US-based information provider Nielsen Holdings NV.
“China is becoming the world's largest market for men's skin care products”, said Neil Wang, global partner and president at consulting firm Frost and Sullivan China. “The market size is over $1 billion (S$1.4 billion), followed by South Korea with total sales value of about $0.7 billion”.
The size of the male facial skin care market in China is projected to reach 11.5 billion yuan by 2020 from 7.3 billion yuan in 2014, according to market research firm Mintel Group Ltd.
“More than 80 per cent of the Chinese men hold an opinion that skin care is important,” said Wang from Frost and Sullivan. “They are willing to spend about 25 minutes every day on skin care products on average”.
Driving the increasing consumption of male cosmetics is the widespread belief in China that looking good plays an important part in succeeding socially and professionally.
Ding Chen, a 30-year-old businessman who spends up to 600 yuan every two months on personal care, particularly on moisturizers, cleansers and cologne, said: “Men spend money on beauty products for improving self-confidence, attracting women and building a better self image. After all, good first impressions can make a big difference.”
That is also an opportunity for foreign brands, which currently take 76.6 per cent share of the men's grooming market in China, to launch beauty products for appearance-conscious consumers.
Satoshi Hirota, a press representative of Japanese cosmetics manufacturer Shiseido Company Ltd, said: “We anticipate huge growth potential in the male beauty market as more and more men are paying attention to their appearance. This year, sales of Shiseido Men's lotion and emulsion in China rose by more than 10 per cent from the levels in 2014”.
Sisheido, which developed the Aupres Mens beauty line exclusively for the Chinese market back in 1994, expects the men's skin care market in the country to maintain a growth momentum of over 10 per cent in 2016. The company is also using the boom in men's beauty products as an opportunity to boost spending in China.
“We cannot reveal the exact amount but we are planning to invest more for expanding points of contact with consumers,” said Hirota.
Germany's Beiersdorf AG sees huge potential in online sales for its Nivea beauty brand in China due to a change in the younger generation's shopping behaviour.
Online sales in the men's grooming market in China currently account for 40 per cent of total sales, according to US-based information provider Nielsen Holdings NV.
Inken Hollmann-Peters, vice-president of Corporate Communications at Beiersdorf, said: “Unlike five years ago when hypermarket and supermarket channels were still dominant, now more men choose to shop from online or cosmetic stores. We estimate a growth (in the men's grooming market in China) of around 15 per cent or more from 2015 to 2020 for both online and offline channels.”
United States-based Procter & Gamble Co, manufacturer of Gillette razors and the Olay Mens Solutions skin care brand, agrees that most men are moving from offline to online channels to purchase grooming products.
Erica Li, a press representative at P&G said: “They even use e-commerce search as the first step to gain product knowledge.”
Increasing disposable income and the desire for a better lifestyle are some of the factors that are expected to keep driving the industry in the coming years, with men being increasingly adventurous with high-end beauty products that go beyond the most basic needs.
Chen Wenwen, a senior beauty analyst at Mintel, said: “There is still huge potential in the men's grooming market in China as customers move on to pricier categories, particularly eye care, serum, or facial cream products with makeup benefits.”
– See more at: http://news.asiaone.com/news/lifestyle/metrosexuals-spawn-14b-cosmetics-market-china#sthash.aXOOq97g.dpuf

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